Research Areas

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Faculty and doctoral students in the Department of Economics are involved with national and international organizations in many areas of research. We are keen on finding the interconnected links of applied economics and theoretical thought, and our faculty take great pride in preparing the next generation of business and academic leaders.

Research Areas

International Economics

International Economics assesses the implications of trading goods and services, as well as investment on a global scale. Our faculty study how the production of one nation is purchased by another nation and how the currency of one nation is exchanged for the currency of another nation to pay for this production. We also study economic and political issues related to international trade and finance. (Finance; Trade; Macroeconomics)

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Econometrics

Econometrics is the application of statistical and mathematical theories in economics for the purpose of testing hypotheses and forecasting future trends. It takes economic models, tests them through statistical trials and then compare and contrast the results against real-life examples. Econometrics can therefore be subdivided into two major categories: theoretical and applied. Our faculty utilize econometric applications in many of our courses. (Applied, Theoretical)

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Microeconomic Theory

Microeconomics is the social science that studies the implications of individual human action, specifically how those decisions affect the utilization and distribution of scarce resources. Microeconomics shows how and why different goods have different values, how individuals make more efficient or more productive decisions, and how individuals’ best coordinate and cooperate with one another. (Chinese Economy, Game Theory, Information, Labor, Marxist Theory, Organizational, Public Economics, Public Finance, Search Theory, Urban Economics)

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Macroeconomic Theory

Macroeconomists develop models explaining relationships between a variety of factors such as consumption, inflation, savings, investments, international trade and finance, national income and output. Such macroeconomic models, and what the models forecast, are used by government entities to aid in the construction and evaluation of economic policy. (Growth and Development; International Economics; International Finance; Monetary Theory)

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Center of Excellence for Human Capital, Technology Transfer, and Economic Growth and Development (HEAD)

The rationale of the Center stems from the growing importance of human capita—the intangible, but very real asset which is driving economic performance, structural change, productivity growth and general well-being, especially in the new “knowledge economy.” At its core, human capital is information and knowledge, and as such it augments not just the production capacity of an economy’s human resources at a point in time, but also the persistent accumulation of new knowledge through research and development, innovation, and creative activities, which enhance productivity growth over time, and thus self-sustaining economic development. (Aging, Chinese Economy, Crime & Law, Development, Education, Growth, Health, Human Capital, Social Security)

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