News Archive

12/6/18
For more than 15 years, UB geologist Margarete Jadamec has studied the Alaskan subduction zone, where two huge pieces of the Earth’s rigid outer layer — the North American Plate and the Pacific Plate — are converging. In this region, the Pacific Plate is being forced under the North American Plate.
8/31/18
In the morning, under a big Arctic sky, in a wild part of the world with no paved roads or electric lines, UB geologist Elizabeth Thomas would board a small pontoon and motor out onto a lake. Beside her, on a typical day, would be a team of three UB students: undergraduate Kayla Hollister, master’s student Megan Corcoran and PhD candidate Allison Cluett.
8/30/18
As the Sept. 15 launch date for NASA’s new ice-monitoring satellite approaches, UB scientists are among many worldwide who are counting down the days.
7/30/18
Six explosions detonated in quick succession, throwing plumes of sand and crushed limestone into the air. Applause broke out. Then, about 50 people, mostly scientists interested in volcanoes, dispersed from their perch on a nearby slope to check on research equipment and scrutinize the crater left behind by the blasts. Welcome to the Field-Scale Experimental Volcanology Workshop run by the UB Center for Geohazards Studies. Taking place from July 24-27, the event drew participants from as far away as Italy and Japan.
6/15/18
How is the Antarctic ice sheet changing in a warming world? A new study that answers this question is significant in part because it represents many of the leading scientists in the field speaking with one voice on this important issue, says UB ice sheet researcher Beata Csatho.
6/1/18
An international conference on glaciers and ice sheets will bring about 80 climate researchers from around the world to Buffalo this June. The event — the International Glaciological Society (IGS) Symposium on Timescales, Processes and Glacier Dynamics — will feature presentations by some of the leading climate researchers of our time. The aim is to advance scientific knowledge of how ice sheets and glaciers respond to climate change, which could lead to improved predictions of how quickly sea levels will rise over the next century and beyond.
5/31/18
When and how did the first people come to the Americas? The conventional story says that the earliest settlers came via Siberia, crossing the now-defunct Bering land bridge on foot and trekking through Canada when an ice-free corridor opened up between massive ice sheets toward the end of the last ice age.
5/31/18
Professor Jason Briner and students were highlighted in the Winter 2018 edition of College Mattersa publication of the College of Arts and Sciences.
3/8/18
Lake effect snowfall is one of nature’s greatest snow machines: It happens when cold winds flow over warmer water, giving rise to intense bands of precipitation that can dump several feet of snow on a single location in hours or days. A new UB study aims to learn more about this phenomenon, which has sired some of the Great Lakes region’s most epic weather events — including a 2014 storm that buried parts of Western New York under 7 feet of snow.
3/8/18
Coral reefs off St. John, part of the U.S. Virgin Islands, suffered severe injury during the storms, say scientists from the University at Buffalo and California State University, Northridge who traveled there in late November to assess the damage — the first step in understanding the reefs’ recovery.