Rachel Lauber

Adjunct Assistant Professor; Director, UB Symphony Orchestra

302 Baird Hall
(716) 645-0627
rachelclauber@gmail.com

Education

DMA, University of Michigan

Specialties

Instrumental Conducting

About

Rachel C. Lauber has served as Music Director and Conductor of the Finger Lakes Symphony Orchestra, Livingston Symphony Orchestra and the University of Michigan Campus Symphony, Nazareth College Orchestra and was conductor of the Detroit Symphony Civic Orchestra sharing the podium in concert with Neeme Jarvi, Tom Wilkins and Mark Wigglesworth. She has appeared as guest conductor with the Rochester Philharmonic, the Slee Sinfonietta, Cordancia Chamber Orchestra and the Holland Symphony Orchestra (MI) and has conducted throughout Italy.

Ms. Lauber served as director of the Detroit Symphony's Unmasked Series working to plan camera shots, direct live cameras and collaborate with guest conductors (Nicolas McGegan, Roger Norrington, JoAnn Falletta, John Adams, Hans Graf and Tom Wilkins) on their pre-, post-, and interactive-concert discussions and lectures. She also served as assistant conductor and assistant to the stage director for the Grammy Award winning production of William Bolcom's Songs of Innocence and of Experience.

Ms. Lauber has studied with Kenneth Kiesler at the University of Michigan where she received her doctorate in orchestral conducting. Her studies include the Brevard Music Center with Gunther Schuller, the Oregon Bach Festival with Helmuth Rilling, and numerous workshops of the Conductor's Guild and the American Symphony Orchestra League. She has studied in Italy at the Accademia Musicale Chigiana in Siena and the Catania International Conductor's Workshop in Sicily. In 2014 she attended the Conductors Guild Conductor/Composer Training Workshop at the Cabrillo Festival of Contemporary Music with artist faculty Marin Alsop and James Ross.

Ms. Lauber has recently been lecturing at the University of Michigan for the University Musical Society Mellon Institute on Arts-Academic Integration Initiative. The program is made possible through a grant from the The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.