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Jeff Higginbotham, Ph.D., CCC-SLP

Professor, Department Chair

Office: 103-D Cary Hall
Office Phone: 716.829.5542
Email: cdsjeff@buffalo.edu

 

Current Work:

My current research activities focus on how augmented communicators interact with each other in real-time and how communication technologies can be designed to improve performance. 

My research involving augmentative communication has generally focused on how individuals with impaired movement (e.g., individuals with cerebral palsy, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/motor neuron disease) engage in interactions using their bodies and augmentative communication technologies related to slowly composed productions and the consequent adaptations made by interactants to accommodate to the increased demands on attention, vigilance, memory, etc. In general, my research has focused on the interactional costs inherent in the use of augmentative devices and how they can be designed to avoid some of these “built” impediments. My research has utilized both group level experimental designs, as well as smaller and more intense microanalytic investigations. . Much of my work has focused on the distortions in interaction time related to slowly composed productions and the consequent adaptations made by interactants to accommodate to the increased demands on attention, vigilance, memory, etc. In general, my research has focused on the interactional costs inherent in the use of augmentative devices and how they can be designed to avoid some of these “built” impediments. My research has utilized both group level experimental designs, as well as smaller and more intense microanalytic investigations. 

Education / Training:

  • Ph.D. University of Wisconsin - Madison, 1985. Comparative Studies in Human Social Interaction.
  • M.S., Communicative Disorders, 1979, University of Louisville. Thesis.
  • A.B., Psychology, 1975, Indiana University.

Employment / Professional Experience:

  • Department of Communicative Disorders and Sciences, University at Buffalo. Promotion to Full Professor, 2008.
  • Department of Communicative Disorders and Sciences, University at Buffalo. Director, Signature Center for Excellence in Augmented Communication, 2004 to Present.
  • Department of Communicative Disorders and Sciences, University at Buffalo. Promotion to Associate Professor with tenure, 1995.
  • Adjunct Graduate faculty member, Rehabilitation Science Department, University at Buffalo, 2007 to Present.

Professional Honors:

  • Recipient, Fellow of the American Speech-Language and Hearing Association, 2014
  • Recipient, Honors of the Association in the Profession for Speech-Language Pathology; Speech and Hearing Association of Western New York, 2013.
  • Recipient, Licensed Innovation award, The Research Foundation, The State University of New York: Innovation, Creation and Discovery, November, 3, 2005.
  • Recipient, Licensed Innovation award, The Research Foundation, The State University of New York: Innovation, Creation and Discovery, November 3, 2005.
  • Nominee, Inventor of the Year, Niagara Frontier Intellectual Property Law Association and the Technical Societies Council of the Niagara Frontier, 2002.

Selected Grants:

  • Higginbotham & Burkard (co-PIs) project pART-IcP-ATE (ART, InterProfessional education, Access Through Technology) (2016). $50,000 total President’s Circle Award (internal). 
  • DeRuyter(PI/Duke),Higginbotham(Co-PI)10/01/08-9/31/13. $600,000 UB/$5,000,000 total. NIDRR: Rehab. Engineering Research Center on Com. Enhancement III.
  • Comparative Outcomes: Effectiveness of Digital and Synthetic Augmentative Alternative Communication Devices for Children who are Non-speaking with Neurodevelopmental Disabilities, Institute for Matching Person and Technology with Sponsor, $79,493.00, September 29, 2008 - September 28, 2011.
  • H133E980026 DeRuyter(PI), Higginbotham (Co-PI) $650,000 UB/$4,500,000 total 11/01/98-10/31/03. NIDRR: RERC on Communication Enhancement (AAC-RERC)
  • 1R43 CA80715-01 Higginbotham(UB PI) Moulton (Business PI) $100,000 total 10/01/98-09/30/99. NCI /SBIR: Frametalker: An Utterance-Based Augmentative Device.
  • ED-98-CO-0031 Lesher(PI), Higginbotham(Consultant) $35,000 (UB). 09/01/98-08/31/00. DOE: Advanced Prediction Methods for Augmentative Communication.
  • Recipient, Department of Education, National Institute on Disability Research and Rehabilitation, Switzer Fellowship, The utilization of communication frames to develop augmentative communication technologies.n$40,000.

Publications:

  • Higginbotham, DJ., Fulcher, K, Seale, J. (2016).  Time and Timing in ALS in Interactions Involving Individuals with ALS, Their Unimpaired Partners and their Speech Generating Devices in Martine Smith (ed), Language learning and language use in aided communication. J&R Publishers, London.
  • Engelke, CR & Higginbotham, DJ (2013). Looking to speak: On the temporality of misalignment in interaction involving an augmented communicator using eye-gaze technology. Journal of Interactional Research in Communication Disorders, 4 (1), 95-122.
  • Higginbotham, DJ & Engelke, CR (2013). A Primer for Doing Talk-in-interaction Research in Augmentative and Alternative Communication, Augmentative and Alternative Communication. 29, 3-19.
  • Fager, S., Bardach, L., Russell, S., & Higginbotham, D. Jeffery (2012). Access to Augmentative and Alternative Communication: New Technologies and Clinical Decision-Making. Journal of Pediatric Rehabilitation Medicine. 5, 53-61.
  • Higginbotham, D. J, Lesher, G., Rorke, B., & Moulton, B. (2012). The Application of Natural Language Processing to Augmentative and Alternative Communication. Assistive Technology, 12(1), 14-24.
  • Higginbotham, D. Jeffery (2009). In-person Interaction in AAC: New perspectives on utterances, multimodality, timing and device design. Perspectives on Augmentative Communication, 18(4), 154-160.
  • Higginbotham, D.J. (2010). Humanizing vox artificialis : the role of speech synthesis in augmentative and alternative communication. In J. Mullennix and S. Stern (eds.), Computer synthesized speech technologies: tools for aiding impairment, Hershey: Medical Information Science Reference. pp. 50-70.
  • Higginbotham, D. J. (2009). In-Person Interaction in AAC: New Perspectives on Utterances, Multimodality, Timing, and Device Design. Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, 18 (4), 110-160.
  • Higginbotham, J., et al. (2009). AAC Technology Transfer: An AAC-RERC Report. Augmentative and Alternative Communication, 25, 68-76.
  • Wisenburn, B., Higginbotham, D.J. (2009). Participant Evaluations of Rate and Communication Efficacy of an AAC Application Using Natural Language Processing. Augmentative and Alternative Communication, 25 (2), 78-89.
  • Higginbotham, D. J, Bisantz, A. M., Sunm, M., Yik, F., Adams, K. (2009). The effect of context priming and task type on augmentative communication performance. Augmentative and Alternative Communication, 25(1), 19 - 31.
  • Higginbotham, D. Jeffery, Wilkins, D. (2009). In-person Interaction in AAC: New perspectives on utterances, multimodality, timing and device design. Perspectives on Augmentative Communication, 10pp.
  • Wisenburn, B., Higginbotham, D. Jeffery (2009). Participant Evaluations of Rate and Communication Efficacy of an AAC Application Using Natural Language Processing. To appear in Augmentative and Alternative Communication, 12 pp.
  • Todman, J., Alm, N.,Higginbotham, D.J., File, P. (2008). Whole utterance approach in AAC. Augmentative and Alternative Communication, 24(3), 235 - 254.
  • Wisenburn, B., Higginbotham, D. Jeffery (2008). An AAC Application Using Speaking Partner Speech Recognition to Automatically Produce Contextually Relevant Utterances: Objective Results. Augmentative and Alternative Communication, 24(2), 100 - 109.
  • Higginbotham, J., Shane, H., Russell, S., & Caves,K. (2007). Access to AAC: Present, Past, and Future. Augmentative and Alternative Communication.23 (3), 243 – 257.
  • Higginbotham, D. Jeffery, Beukelman, D., Blackstone, S., Bryen, D., Caves, K., Deruyter, F., Jakobs, T., Light, J., McNaughton, D., Moulton, B., Williams, M. (2009). AAC Technology Transfer: An AAC-RERC Report. Augmentative and Alternative Communication, 25, 68 - 76.
  • Higginbotham, D.J. Kim, K. & Scally, C. (2007). The effect of the communication output method on augmented interaction. Augmentative and Alternative Communication,23(2), 140-153.
  • Smith, L., Higginbotham, D.J., Lesher, G. & Mathy, P. (2006). The Development of an Automated Method for Analyzing Communication Rate in Augmentative and Alternative Communication. Assistive Technology. 18, 107-121.
  • Capilouto, G.J., Higginbotham, J., McClenaghan, B., Williams, H., & Dickerson, J. (2005). Comparison of a head operated device and expanded keyboard in a target acquisition task. Technology and Disability.
  • Burkard, R., Higginbotham, D.J., Lezynski, J. and Stecker, N. (2005). The AuD Program at the University at Buffalo, American Journal of Audiology, 13 (2), 118-125.
  • Welland, R., Lubinski, R. & Higginbotham, D.J. (2003). Discourse Comprehension Test Performance of Elders with Dementia of the Alzheimer Type. Journal of Speech, Languge and Hearing Research, 45, 1175-1187.
  • Higginbotham, D. J. (2003). Formulating research questions: Linking theory to the research process. In R. W. Schlosser (Ed.), The Efficacy of Augmentative and Alternative Communication: Toward Evidence-Based Practices (pp. 43-55). St. Louis: Elsevier.
  • Higginbotham, D. J. & Caves, K. (2002). AAC performance and usability issues: the effect of AAC technology on the communicative process. Assistive Technology 14(1): 45-57.
  • Higginbotham, D.J., Lesher, G.W., Moulton, B.J. & Rinkus, G.J. (2002) Automated Data Logging in Augmentative Communication. In J. Winters, C. Robinson, R. Simpson, G. Vanderheiden, Eds.), Emerging and Accessible Telecommunications, Information and Healthcare Technologies – Engineering Challenges in Enabling Universal Access. Arlington, Resna Press. 82-94.
  • Higginbotham, D.J. & Wilkins, D.P. (1999). Slipping through the timestream: Time and timing issues in augmentative communication. To appear in J. Duchan, D. Kovarsky & M. Maxwell (eds.), The social construction of language incompetence, Lawrence Ehrlbaum, Publisher. pp 49 – 82.
  • Lesher, G., Moulton, B. & Higginbotham, D.J. (1999). Scanning alternatives for augmentative communication systems. Augmentative and Alternative Communication, 14, 81-101.
  • Lesher, G., Moulton, B., & Higginbotham. D.J.(1998). Optimal arrangements for ambiguous keyboards. IEEE Transactions on Rehabilitation Engineering, 6, 415-423.
  • Higginbotham, D. J., & Baird, E. (1995). Analysis of listeners' summaries of synthesized speech passages. AAC Augmentative & Alternative Communication, 11(2), 101-112.
  • Higginbotham, D. J., & Bedrosian, J. L. (1995). Subject selection in AAC research: Decision points. AAC Augmentative & Alternative Communication, 11(1), 11-13.
  • Higginbotham, D. J., Scally, C. A., Lundy, D. C., & Kowarsky, K. (1995). Discourse comprehension of synthetic speech across three augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) output methods. Journal of Speech & Hearing Research, 38(4), 889-901.
  • Higginbotham, D. J., Drazek, A., L. Kowarsky, K., Scally, C., & Segal, E. (1994). Discourse comprehension of synthetic speech delivered at normal and slow presentation rates. AAC Augmentative and Alternative Communication, 10(3), 191-202.
  • Higginbotham, D. J. (1989). The interplay of communication device output mode and interaction style between nonspeaking persons and their speaking partners. Journal of Speech & Hearing Disorders, 54(3), 320-333.

Teaching:

  • CDS 480: Clinical Observation Methods
  • CDS 502: Evaluating Clinical Change
  • CDS 670: Augmentative Communication
  • CDS 681, 683: Seminar in Augmentative Communication Research
  • CDS 681: Seminar in Language Transcription and Analysis
  • CDS 687: Doctoral Seminar

Service:

National/International

  • Program Chair, 2008 Clinical AAC Conference.
  • ISAAC Program Commitee, 1996 Convention.
  • Co-organizer for conference on Augmentative Communication Research. Sponsored by NIDCD, 2004.
  • ISAAC Program Commitee, 1994 Convention.
  • ASHA Lanugage Disorders IV Program Committee Chair, 1992 convention.
  • ASHA Lanugage Disorders IV, Program Committee Chair, 1991 convention.