2018-19 Events

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Flyer for "Cosmopolitanism vs. Globalization" symposium

"The Infrahuman: Animality in Modern Jewish Philosophy" by Professor Noam Pines

Book Launch

Date: February 7th, 2019
Time: 6:30pm - 7:30pm
Location: University at Buffalo, North Campus, 708 Clemens Hall

Free and open to all students and the public
For more information, contact: jfarrugi@buffalo.edu


Come join us in the Friedman Library to celebrate Prof. Noam Pines’ latest book! The book explores a little-known aspect in major works of Jewish literature from the period preceding World War II, in which Jewish writers in German, Hebrew, and Yiddish employed figures of animals in depictions of Jews and Jewish identity. Rather than serving as figures of Jewish “self-hatred,” the book argues that Jewish writers employed animals as a way to question prevalent notions of Jewish identity, and to subject pejorative designations of Judaism to literary elaboration and to philosophical negotiation.

Professor David Patterson

"Nazism and the Jewish Other" By Professor Elliot R. Wolfson

David Blitzer Lecture Series

Date:February 26th, 2019
Time: 7:00pm
Location: University at Buffalo, North Campus, 120 Clemens Hall

Free and open to all students and the public
For more information, contact: jfarrugi@buffalo.edu



"The Other Others" by Professor Sergey Dolgopolski

David Blitzer October Lecture Flyer

Book Launch

Date: April 29th, 2019
Time: 6:30pm - 7:30pm
Location: University at Buffalo, North Campus, 708 Clemens Hall

Free and open to all students and the public
For more information, contact: jfarrugi@buffalo.edu


Come join us in the Friedman Library to celebrate Professor Sergey Dolgopolski's new book! "The Other Others" puts contemporary political theory and a literary-theoretical exploration of the core text of Rabbinic Judaism, the Talmud, into both a fruitful and tensed conversation one with another. In the words of the book's catalogue description: "Denying legal and moral existence to those who do not belong to a land, while tolerating diversity of those who do stabilizes a political order—or does it? Revisiting this core problem of contemporary political theory, Other Others turns to the Talmud as an untapped resource for a conception of the political and a take on excluded others our philosophical and theological traditions have effaced."