Gregory Loney

PhD

Gregory Loney.

Gregory Loney

PhD

Gregory Loney

PhD

Research Interests

Behavioral pharmacology and neural circuitry of motivated behavior; polysubstance abuse; obesity and overeating

Contact Information

Park Hall

Buffalo NY, 14260-4110

gcloney@buffalo.edu

Education

  • PhD, Florida State University

Current Research

Why do we continue to perform behaviors despite adverse consequences? More specifically, why do we take drugs and overeat when we are aware of the deleterious health effects? Ultimately, my research is aimed at elucidating the neurophysiological mechanisms that contribute to dysregulated behaviors including drug abuse and nonhomeostatic food consumption. Currently, my lab is examining how insular cortical dysfunction alters the salience of the reinforcing and aversive properties of drugs of abuse with an emphasis on how nicotine, acting within the insula, may promote susceptibility to polysubstance use. To address these questions, we employ a number of neurobehavioral techniques including circuit-specific chemogenetic manipulations and site-specific neuropharmacology to assess changes in motivated behavior.

Selected Publications

  • Loney. G.C., Angelyn, H., Cleary, L.M., Meyer, P.J. (2019) Nicotine produces a high-approach, low-avoidance phenotype in response to alcohol-associated cues in male rats. Alcohol Clin and Exp Rsrch 43(6):1284-1295
  • Loney, G.C., Meyer, P.J. (2019) Nicotine pre-treatment reduces sensitivity to the interoceptive stimulus effects of commonly abused drugs as assessed with taste conditioning paradigms. Drug and Alcohol Dependence 194: 341-350
  • Loney, G.C., Pautassi, R.M. Kapadia, D., Meyer, P.J. (2018) Nicotine affects ethanol-conditioned taste, but not place, aversion in a simultaneous conditioning procedure. Alcohol 71: 47-55
  • Maske, C.B., Loney G.C., Lilly N., Terrill S.J., Williams D.L. (2018) Intragastric nutrient infusion reduces motivation for food in male and female rats. Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab. 2018 Jul 1;315(1):E81-E90
  • Loney, G.C., Meyer, P.J. (2018) Brief exposures to the taste of ethanol and quinine promote subsequent acceptance of ethanol in a paradigm that minimizes post-ingestive consequences. Alcohol Clin and Exp Rsrch 42(3): 589-602
  • Loney, G.C., Blonde, G.D., Eckel, L.A., Spector, A.C. (2012) Determinants of taste preference and acceptability: Quality versus hedonics. Journal of Neuroscience 32(29): 10086-10092