Shira Gabriel

PhD

Shira Gabriel.

Shira Gabriel

PhD

Shira Gabriel

PhD

Research Interests

Social self; intimacy seeking and social comparison; need to belong

Contact Information

358 Park Hall

Buffalo NY, 14260-4110

Phone: (716) 645-0227

sgabriel@buffalo.edu

Education

  • PhD, Northwestern University

Current Research

My primary area of interest is the social nature of the self. Within that broad area, my students and I have examined Social Surrogacy – the tendency for humans to form psychological relationships with non-human (on non-physically available) entities, the social functions of the self, the need to belong, and how our relationships shape our feelings about ourselves (and vice versa). We also study the psychological importance of spending time in large, anonymous crowds such as at concerts, sporting events, rallies, and religious gatherings. Much of our research is guided by the proposition that humans are a fundamentally social species and thus a great deal of human behavior can be best understood as being in service of connecting to others. Even when we think we are not being social (i.e. when we watch TV or surf the web) social motivations are behind our actions.

Selected Publications

  • Gabriel, S., Paravati, E., Green, M. C., & Flomsbee, J. (2018). From Apprentice to President: The role of parasocial connection in the election of Donald Trump. Social Psychological and Personality Science.
  • Gabriel, S., Valenti, J., Naragon-Gainey, K., & Young, A. F. (2017) The psychological importance of going to concerts, churches, and football games: Development and validation of the Tendency for Effervescent Assembly Measure (TEAM). Psychological Assessment, 29(11), 1349 -1362.
  • Gomillion, S., Gabriel, S., Kawakami, K., & Young, A. F. (2017). Let’s stay home and watch TV: The benefits of shared media use for close relationships. Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, 34 (6), 855-874.
  • Buffone, A., Gabriel, S., & Poulin, M. (2016). There but for the grace of God: Counterfactuals influence religious belief and images of the divine. Social and Personality Psychological Science, 7, 256-263.
  • Gabriel, S., Valenti, J., & Young, A. F. (2016). Watching, reading, and eating your way to belonging: Symbolic social relationships and the social self. Advances in Experimental Social Psychology, 53, 189-243.
  • Gomillion, S., Gabriel, S., & Murray, S. L. (2014). A friend of yours is no friend of mine: Jealousy toward a romantic partner’s friends. Social and Personality Psychological Science, 5, 636-643.
  • Young, A. F., Gabriel, S., & Schlager, O. (2014). Does this friend make me look fat? Appearance-related comparisons within women’s close friendships. Journal of Basic and Applied Psychology, 36, 145-154.
  • Young, A. F., & Gabriel, S. (2013). Batman to the rescue! The protective effects of parasocial relationships with muscular superheroes on men's body image. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 49, 173-177.
  • Gabriel, S., & Young, A. F. (2011). Becoming a vampire without being bitten: The narrative collective-assimilation hypothesis. Psychological Science, 22, 990-994.
  • Gabriel, S., Kawakami, K., Bartak, C., Kang, S., & Mann, N. (2010). Negative self-synchronization: Will I change to be like you when it is bad for me? Journal of Personality and Social Psychology98(6), 857-871.
  • Derrick, J., Gabriel, S., & Hugenberg, K. (2009). Social surrogacy: How favored television programs provide the experience of belonging. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology45(2), 352-362.
  • Gabriel, S., Carvallo, M., Dean, K., Tippin, B. D., & Renaud, J. (2005). How I see “me” depends on how I see “we”: The role of attachment style in social comparison. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 31, 1561-1572.